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NHS FPX 8002 Assessment 3 Personal Leadership Portrait Part 2

Student Name Capella University NHS-FPX 8002 Collaboration, Communication, and Case Analysis for Doctoral Learners Prof. Name Date Personal Leadership Portrait Part 2 A self-reflection on one’s leadership style and qualities within the healthcare profession serves as the foundation for a personal leadership portrait in healthcare. Constructed from individual experiences, values, and beliefs, this image serves as a guide for personal and professional development. Various leadership styles, such as transactional, transformational, servant, charismatic, contingency, and trait, distinguish leaders. Through self-evaluation, a transformational leadership style is identified, aimed at motivating and inspiring collaboration within a team. This discussion explores essential components like diversity, inclusion, communication, collaboration, and professionalism for effective leadership. Personal Approach to Leadership Effective leadership necessitates a blend of leadership traits, strategic and technical awareness, and emotional intelligence. In the ever-changing healthcare industry, leaders must adapt and implement strategies for the benefit of both the organization and the team. Transformational leadership aligns with ethical leadership, emphasizing encouragement and motivation to achieve common goals. In my role as a clinical and lab instructor, transformational leadership is pivotal in fostering positive behavior change and motivating students for professional education. Change is inevitable, and leaders must incorporate it while considering others’ feelings. Emotional intelligence is crucial for healthcare leadership, involving effective emotion management, team communication, positive patient relationships, and navigating interpersonal dynamics. The essential emotional intelligence characteristics—self-awareness, self-regulation, self-motivation, empathy, and social skill—are critical for successful leadership. As a leader, thoughtful consideration before reacting is crucial, particularly in high-pressure environments. Interprofessional Communication, Collaboration, and Change Management Effective healthcare leadership involves building interprofessional relationships, engaging the community, and managing change to enhance patient outcomes and organizational success. Transformational leaders collaborate and communicate with diverse healthcare members to achieve common goals. Best practices, including fostering respect, open communication, and providing professional development opportunities, contribute to effective change management. However, communication strategies may vary between leading a group of students and managing a trauma scene. Ethical Leadership in Professional Practice Principles of ethical leadership play a vital role in guiding professional practice, emphasizing patient well-being, autonomy, fairness, and justice. Ethical leaders act as moral role models, upholding values such as honesty, fairness, integrity, and respect. Ethical conduct forms the foundation of transformational leadership, particularly in bringing about positive changes with respect and dignity. Nursing leaders have a responsibility to uphold ethical standards and model them for others. Diversity and Inclusion in Healthcare Leadership Diversity and inclusion in healthcare leadership involve valuing differences, ensuring everyone feels included and respected, and addressing health equity. As a leader, creating a diverse and inclusive workplace is vital for better healthcare quality and service. Best practices include ongoing cultural competency training, fostering inclusivity through surveys, involving patients and the community in decision-making, and actively addressing diversity and inclusion issues. Scholar-Practitioner in Healthcare A scholar-practitioner in healthcare combines theoretical knowledge with practical experience, contributing to the field through research, professional practice, and thought leadership. Critical thinking is crucial for evaluating complex information and making informed decisions. Scholar-practitioners in healthcare influence policy, mentor future leaders, expand knowledge through research, and improve healthcare quality and safety. Conclusion Effective leadership involves creating an environment that encourages open communication, motivates positive behavior, and upholds moral and ethical conduct. A transformational leader embraces diversity and inclusion, acts as a scholar-practitioner, and interprets research and theory for the benefit of both patients and the organization. References Debesay, J., Arora, S., & Fougner, M. (2022). Organizational culture and ethnic diversity in nursing homes: A qualitative study of healthcare workers’ and ward nurses’ experiences. BMC Health Services Research, 22(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-022-08184-y Gaines, K. (2022). What is the nursing code of ethics? Nurse.org. https://nurse.org/education/nursing-code-of-ethics/ Health equity. (2021). World Health Organization. https://www.who.int/health-topics/health-equity#tab=tab_1 Issah, M. (2018). Change leadership: The role of emotional intelligence. Sage Open. https://journals-sagepub-com.library.capella.edu/doi/pdf/10.1177/2158244018800910 Jambawo, S. (2018). Transformational leadership and ethical leadership: Their significance in the mental healthcare system. British Journal of Nursing, 27(17), 998-1001. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2018.27.17.998 Jhamb, S., & Carlson, K. W. (2020). Managing workplace ethical dilemmas, perceptual ethical leadership, accountability, and management outcomes: A critical review and future directions. The Journal of Applied Business and Economics, 22(9), 53-67. https://www.proquest.com/docview/2498625633?parentSessionId=Qadax2dYCb6VwrMCOYW6F3167%2FnDQ2AN4w33dSdv0Og%3D%26pq-origsite=summon&accountid=27965 Strategies for patient, family, and caregiver engagement. (2019). Agency for Healthcare and Research Policy. https://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/products/family-engagement/protocol NHS FPX 8002 Assessment 3 Personal Leadership Portrait Part 2

NHS FPX 8002 Assessment 2 Personal Leadership Portrait Part 1

Student Name Capella University NHS-FPX 8002 Collaboration, Communication, and Case Analysis for Doctoral Learners Prof. Name Date Personal Leadership Portrait A self-evaluation of one’s leadership style and qualities within the healthcare profession constitutes a personal leadership portrait. This visual representation is shaped by an individual’s unique experiences, values, and beliefs, providing a roadmap for personal and professional development. Different leadership styles, such as transactional, transformational, servant, charismatic, contingency, and trait, distinguish leaders. In this case, the outcome of the leadership portrait self-evaluation reflects a transformational leadership style, with the primary objective being to motivate and inspire collaboration within a team. This evaluation delves into critical components like diversity, inclusion, communication, collaboration, and professionalism, all of which are integral to becoming an effective leader. Personal Approach to Leadership Effective leadership requires a combination of leadership traits, strategic and technical awareness, and emotional intelligence. In the dynamic and complex healthcare industry, leaders must adapt, stay abreast of changes, and implement strategies beneficial to the organization and team. The possession of transformational leadership characteristics aligns with ethical leadership principles. Encouragement and motivation, crucial components of transformational leadership, play a pivotal role in my capacity as a clinical and lab instructor, where the ultimate goal is to produce more professionally educated nurses (Jambawo, 2018). Change Management and Emotional Intelligence Change is inevitable, and as a leader, integrating change while considering others’ emotions is paramount. Effective healthcare leadership requires emotional intelligence, encompassing the management of emotions, fostering positive relationships, and navigating complex dynamics. The five characteristics of emotional intelligence—self-awareness, self-regulation, self-motivation, empathy, and social skill—are vital in healthcare leadership (Issah, 2018). As a professor and an emergency room nurse, effective communication is imperative, and different situations may necessitate various leadership styles, such as transactional, servant, or charismatic, depending on the context (Styles of Leadership Matrix, 2023). Interprofessional Communication, Collaboration, and Change Management Effective healthcare leadership involves building interprofessional relationships, engaging the community, and managing change for improved patient outcomes. As a transformational leader, collaboration and communication with diverse healthcare members are crucial to achieving shared goals. Implementing best practices, fostering respect, encouraging discussions, and providing professional development opportunities contribute to successful change management (Jambawo, 2018). Ethical Leadership in Professional Practice Ethical leadership principles play a crucial role in guiding professional practice. These leaders serve as moral role models, emphasizing the importance of promoting patients’ well-being, respecting autonomy, and ensuring fair and just healthcare decisions. Principles such as honesty, fairness, integrity, and respect align with traits exhibited by ethical leaders, influencing followers to uphold ethical conduct (Jambawo, 2018). The nursing code of ethics, based on the work of Florence Nightingale, serves as a foundation for ethical leadership in healthcare. Diversity and Inclusion in Health Care Leadership Diversity and inclusion are essential components of effective healthcare leadership, aiming to value and celebrate differences among individuals and groups. Health equity, defined by the World Health Organization, strives for fair and preventable health outcome discrepancies across different groups (Health Equity, 2021). A leader promoting diversity and inclusion implements best practices, understands diverse backgrounds, fosters an inclusive environment, and actively involves patients and the community in decision-making processes (Debesay et al., 2022). Scholar-Practitioner in Healthcare A scholar-practitioner in healthcare is proficient in both theoretical knowledge and practical experience. Critical thinking is crucial for evaluating complex information and making informed decisions. Scholar-practitioners in healthcare contribute to the field by conducting research, advancing policies and practices, and mentoring future leaders. They expand healthcare knowledge, improve quality and safety, and address real-world challenges through the application of theoretical understanding and practical experience (Zaccagnini et al., 2022). Conclusion Effective healthcare leadership entails creating an environment where individuals can freely express themselves, promoting collaboration, and fostering positive motivation. Transformational leadership aligns with ethical behavior, advocating for justice and fairness regardless of background. A leader should embody the role of a scholar-practitioner, utilizing both theoretical knowledge and practical experience to address challenges and benefit both patients and the organization. References Debesay, J., Arora, S., & Fougner, M. (2022). Healthcare Workers’ and Ward Nurses’ Experiences: Organizational Culture and Ethnic Diversity in Nursing Homes. BMC Health Services Research, 22(1), https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-022-08184-y Gaines, K. (2022). What Is the Nursing Code of Ethics? Nurse.org. https://nurse.org/education/nursing-code-of-ethics/ Health equity. (2021). World Health Organization. https://www.who.int/health-topics/health-equity#tab=tab_1 Issah, M. (2018). Change Leadership: The Role of Emotional Intelligence. Sage Open. https://journals-sagepub-com.library.capella.edu/doi/pdf/10.1177/2158244018800910 Jambawo, S. (2018). Transformational Leadership and Ethical Leadership: Their Significance in the Mental Healthcare System. British Journal of Nursing, 27(17), 998-1001. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2018.27.17.998 Jhamb, S., & Carlson, K. W. (2020). Managing Workplace Ethical Dilemmas, Perceptual Ethical Leadership, Accountability, and Management Outcomes: A Critical Review and Future Directions. The Journal of Applied Business and Economics, 22(9), 53-67. https://www.proquest.com/docview/2498625633?parentSessionId=Qadax2dYCb6VwrMCOYW6F3167%2FnDQ2AN4w33dSdv0Og%3D %26pq-origsite=summon&accountid=27965 Strategies for Patient, Family, and Caregiver Engagement. (2019). Agency for Healthcare and Research Policy. https://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/products/family-engagement/protocol NHS FPX 8002 Assessment 2 Personal Leadership Portrait Part 1

NHS FPX 8002 Assessment 1 Demonstrating Effective Leadership

Student Name Capella University NHS-FPX 8002 Collaboration, Communication, and Case Analysis for Doctoral Learners Prof. Name Date Demonstrating Effective Leadership The United States is currently grappling with one of the highest maternal morbidity and mortality rates among developed nations globally (Johnson, 2022). In 2021, there was a 40% surge in maternal deaths, marking it as one of the worst years for maternal mortality in U.S. history (Hoyert, 2021). A particularly alarming concern is the significant racial and ethnic disparity in maternal outcomes, with Black women being three to four times more likely to experience pregnancy-related deaths compared to white women (CDC, 2019). In response to this crisis, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) established the Perinatal Quality Collaboratives (PQCs), a collaborative initiative between federal and state governments aimed at improving healthcare processes to prevent maternal deaths and reduce racial disparities. However, effective local implementation necessitates a leadership coalition. This paper focuses on strategies to enhance Black maternal health in Palm Beach County, Florida, through the formation of a collaborative coalition, analyzing contributing factors, and proposing interventions. Contributing Factors The maternal death rate in the United States rose by nearly 20% in 2020, reaching the highest level among economically developed countries (Johnson, 2022). Maternal mortality, as defined by the CDC, includes deaths of women during pregnancy or within 42 days of termination, excluding accidental or incidental causes (CDC, 2019). Leading medical causes of maternal mortality in the U.S. include blood clots in the lung, hypertension, and blood loss (Johnson, 2022). Disturbingly, African American (AA) mothers face three to four times the risk of pregnancy-related death compared to white or Hispanic mothers (Collier & Molina, 2017). Southern states, particularly Florida, exhibit the highest maternal mortality rates and interval rate increases (Snyder et al., 2020). Regional variations highlight the lowest per-population healthcare provider ratios in the South, especially for certified nurse-midwives and obstetricians (Snyder et al., 2020). Longitudinal studies emphasize higher maternal morbidity rates among AA mothers in the southern United States (Kramer et al., 2023). Despite Florida ranking 32nd in maternal mortality rates among U.S. states, racial disparities persist (Bravender, 2020). Leading causes of maternal death among Black women, including cardiomyopathy, eclampsia, and preeclampsia, occur at rates five times higher than in white women (MacDorman et al., 2021). Disparities persist even when controlling for factors like education and socioeconomic status (Petersen et al., 2019). Black women often report poor continuity of care, communication gaps, and a perceived lack of attentiveness in their maternal experiences with the U.S. healthcare system (Wang et al., 2021). Maternal deaths among Black women, often preventable, result from issues such as cardiomyopathy with noticeable symptoms (MacDorman et al., 2021). Implicit bias, lack of access to quality healthcare, inadequate health insurance, and racism contribute to health disparities (Bravender, 2020). Coalition to Address Maternal Morbidity A coalition in Palm Beach County, Florida, consisting of healthcare professionals and community organizations, aims to analyze factors contributing to poor maternal outcomes for African-American women. The five-member coalition comprises an Obstetrician-Gynecologist, Certified Nurse Midwife, Labor & Delivery Registered Nurse, Doula, and a representative from the Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition of Palm Beach County, Inc. Their diverse expertise contributes to analyzing components leading to high rates of Black maternal deaths and implementing evidence-based strategies. The coalition focuses on improving patient safety, healthcare quality, and reducing racial disparities. Issues Affecting Collaboration Several potential issues may impact interprofessional collaboration, including communication gaps, time constraints, undefined roles and responsibilities, biases, differences of opinion, and ineffective leadership. Hierarchy conflicts may arise among team members, such as obstetricians and certified nurse midwives. Autonomy is crucial but could become a barrier without compromise, trust, or respect for all team members. Strategies to Optimize Collaboration Effective collaboration is essential for developing strategies to reduce health disparities and enhance patient safety. A shared mission, clearly defined roles and responsibilities, good communication, and a collaborative approach with other organizations addressing similar issues are crucial elements for success (Downey et al., 2018). The coalition’s mission to ensure optimal birth outcomes for AA mothers in Palm Beach County, Florida, requires shared values and responsibilities among team members. Clear role definitions and equal participation in decision-making foster effective teamwork. Collaboration with other organizations addressing maternal health issues enhances the coalition’s impact. Ethical Considerations The coalition’s goal of reducing racial disparities in birth outcomes necessitates adherence to ethical principles such as respect, justice, equity, and beneficence. Beneficence involves acting in the best interests of patients, emphasizing prevention of significant disparities in maternal outcomes among Black communities. Justice requires fair and equitable treatment, advocating for improved access to quality care for AA women during the preconception, pregnancy, and postpartum periods. Ethical considerations also include addressing racialized pregnancy stigma through anti-bias training for healthcare providers, fostering culturally sensitive interactions, and promoting positive healthcare experiences. Collaboration, Diversity, and Inclusion While Black women and their families are disproportionately affected by adverse maternal outcomes, this public health crisis impacts all Americans. Discrimination and ill treatment can harm the entire community’s health. Therefore, a diverse multidisciplinary coalition is essential to address this issue comprehensively. Coalition diversity is associated with higher success rates, and inclusivity promotes a collaborative atmosphere that respects diverse experiences and inputs. Literature Review to Address Maternal Morbidity Maternal outcomes in the U.S. lag behind other developed nations, with Black birthing communities experiencing the poorest outcomes. Community-informed models, focusing on social and structural determinants of health, have shown promise in addressing racial health equity and improving maternal outcomes for AA women. Diversifying the women’s health workforce, promoting cultural sensitivity in medical education, and broadening interprofessional training can be evidence-based interventions derived from current research. References Bravender, R. (2020). ‘It’s not fine.’ Black mothers and babies are dying in Florida. Florida Phoenix. https://floridaphoenix.com/2020/01/30/its-not-fine-black-mothers-and-babies-are-dying-in-florida/ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2019). Pregnancy-related deaths. https://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/maternalinfanthealth/pregnancy-relatedmortality.htm Collier, A.Y., & Molina, R.L. (2021). Maternal mortality in the United States: Updates on trends, causes, and solutions. Neoreviews, 20(10), e561-e574. https://doi.org/10.1542/neo.20-10-e561 Downey, L.M., Ireson, C.L., Slavova, S., & McKee, G. (2018). Defining elements of success: A critical pathway of coalition development. Health Promotion